How Is Child Support Determined In Ohio?

Whether two parents have filed for divorce or dissolution, legally separated or were never married to begin with, their children deserve to be well-cared for. For this reason, the Ohio courts expect both parents to contribute to the children's basic needs. Typically, the children will spend the majority of overnights with one parent while the other will contribute financially.

Attorney Kristen L. Campbell has been representing clients throughout Butler County, Ohio, since 1998. Call to schedule your complimentary initial consultation at 513-895-0030.

Factors In Child Support Payment Calculations

As an experienced and caring advocate, she knows how to fairly calculate child support payments, taking into account:

  • Both parties' income, including overtime and self-employment income
  • Health insurance costs
  • Day care expenses
  • Union dues
  • Local taxes
  • Other relevant factors

What Are The Child Support Guidelines?

The term "guidelines" may be misleading. The Child Support Guidelines are the very means by which a child support obligation is calculated in Ohio. However, courts are allowed to deviate from the calculated amount if that amount would be unjust or inappropriate and not in the best interest of the child.

How Long Do Payments Last?

Child support usually continues until emancipation, which is usually defined as age 18, or until the child graduates from high school (up to age 19), whichever is later. In certain limited cases, child support may end earlier or extend past normal emancipation age.

How Can I Modify Or Enforce A Support Order?

For a child support order to be eligible for modification in Ohio, there must be a 10 percent difference in the final number, or the circumstances that led to the order must have changed significantly.

In some cases, it is possible to request a deviation. For example, a father may seek to increase his parenting time in order to pay less money per month in support. Ms. Campbell can advise you about the factors that the court considers for a deviation.

If the other parent is not paying court-ordered support, we can take legal action such as filing a motion for contempt.

Arrange A Free Initial Consultation

Law Office of Kristen L. Campbell, LLC, offers weekend and evening appointments by request, so don't hesitate to schedule a free initial consultation with our lawyer today. Call our Hamilton office at 513-895-0030 or send us an email.