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Posts tagged "Property Division"

Before divorce, think about property division

Once in a great while, the Hamilton Journal-News will have on its pages an article about someone who gets hit as they try to drive across railroad tracks. People might wonder what the person was thinking. Why did they try to cross with a train so near? Well, it seems likely that in many cases, they never heard or saw the train coming.

Chained to a marriage

About 40 miles northeast of Hamilton, an Ohio man sells his services as a life coach to individuals and companies. He says on his website that his goal is to help people reengage in life, reduce their stress and increase their energy. He wants to "illuminate blind spots, and foster shifts in thinking" in his clients.

Equality is not always the goal

We all remember the grade school lesson about equality: "All men are created equal," it says in the Declaration of Independence. Abraham Lincoln repeated the phrase in his Gettysburg Address. Thomas Jefferson wrote about equal rights and the Supreme Court had chiseled on the front of its imposing building the famous phrase "equal justice under the law."

Ashley Madison leak raises questions about fault divorce in Ohio

People get divorced for many reasons, but perhaps one of the most emotionally fraught is infidelity. More spouses throughout the country are currently feeling the sting of cheating after hackers leaked the personal information of 37 million alleged users of Ashley Madison, the extramarital dating service.

The property division conundrum

Property division is a very delicate matter in divorce. Some states follow community property laws, which divide property into two categories (community and separate property). Other states, such as Ohio, follow equitable distribution. This way of dealing with property division says that a judge decides what is "equitable" for the splitting couples. Note that this doesn't mean "equal" or "fair." One spouse may get far more assets and/or property than the other spouse simply because the judge finds it to be "equitable."

The many ways in which a prenup can be appealed

About a month ago, we wrote a post about prenuptial agreements. More specifically, we wrote about how there are certain things you can, and certain things you can't, include in the prenuptial agreement. But there is another important matter to consider about the prenup beyond just "getting a prenup" and "what can I include in the prenup."

Some overlooked financial topics during a divorce

So you and your spouse decide that it is time for the two of you to divorce. This is a big step to take, and there will be a lot on your mind in the coming weeks and months. You'll go through a lot personally, mentally, and emotionally, and though it will certainly be a difficult time, you can come out the other side with a fresh perspective on life and a means to write a new chapter in the book that is your life.

Can you include anything in a prenuptial agreement?

Many people may incorrectly assume that a prenuptial agreement can contain language that outlines who any issue or matter is dealt with in a marriage or divorce. However, not every issue is on the table when a couple is putting together their prenuptial agreement. Along the same lines, not every topic that is included in a prenuptial agreement may hold up under review. It is possible to successfully challenge a prenuptial agreement (or just parts of it) on a variety of legal grounds or arguments.

Custody of a pet can be a major issue in divorce

Imagine that you and your spouse have been married for many years. At some point in the marriage, the two of you decided that you didn't want to have kids. Instead, you decided you wanted to share a pet. So you two got a dog, and you have loved and cared for it ever since.

What to look for in a military divorce

When it comes to divorce, you probably don't think about the implications of such a split on a military family. Military divorce is a complex matter that requires the two spouses to be prepared, organized, and well-represented so that they can get through the divorce with as few complications as possible.

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